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Sask Film Tax Credit Briefing

March 28, 2012
Sask Film Tax Credit Briefing

A short explanation on why the film industry is upset about the government's plan to get rid of the film tax credit. Right now the government gives the film industry upwards of 55% of their wages. Meanwhile, the typical Saskatchewan business receives nothing.

The Wall government has promised to end the subsidy and treat businesses more fairly. Tell him 'don't back down,' taxpayers should be the ones who decide which movies and businesses receive their money.

premier@gov.sk.ca

By
on March 29, 2012
This is such an over simplified explanation of the Sask tax credit. This makes it sound like the credit just pays 55% of film wages. It is a tax credit that applies against the wages of employees based in Sask that are hired by a production. Money doesn't just get paid out for nothing and it doesn't compare to what is brought in. Over it's life time a $100 mil out to $600 mil in. Sounds like a good investment to me. Maybe we could talk about billions in fighter jets? Where is your stance on this? Sorry CTF, but once again you don't speak for this taxpayer.

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By
on March 30, 2012
A response to this comment would be nice.

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By
on April 04, 2012
This video is misleading at best. I work in the industry in Saskatchewan. My company doesn't receive any direct dollars from the tax credit. We did over 2 million in business last year - 90% of which stayed right in Sask. We have 11 full time employees who all pay taxes and who are long time residents of this province. CTF - you don't speak for this taxpayer.

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By
on April 20, 2012
If the film company is doing so well it shud be able to stand on it's own like any other business.Cut off the gravy train, there's no longer a free lunch.Good job Brad.

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By
on July 24, 2012
I have always thought the CTF was a little academically void, but I decided to come check you out again because I agree with what you said about the new stadium in Regina. Your organization seems bent on oversimplification when it suits your need. Not only does this make you lose credibility, it also gives people like me grounds to roll our eyes and dismiss you. First, loads of research (I'd start listing citations, but you won't read them) indicate that technology companies do not flourish in areas without strong cultural communities. Gifted software developers are artists and are drawn to other artists. Killing off the sask film industry will kill of the advances in augmented reality, endpoint security, mobile games, and social technologies. It is already near impossible to get talented engineers to relocate to Saskatchewan; killing off culture only makes that worse. Does your organization also want to kill of SR&ED credits? That would put the final nail in the tech sector's coffin. Now, time for some basic economics. Do you know what a multiplier effect is? Few people save 100% of their income. Rather, we spend our money in the community. If I spend $50 in a local store, the owner of that store uses some to pay his/her expenses and then saves some and spends a portion. Consequently, my $50 goes into other people's consumption. This cycle of spending, where my spending is recycled is called a multiplier effect and in Canada, the multiplier effect on wages is around 5. This means that if the film industry pays out $500M in salaries, that will create an overall economic impact of $2.5B. But yes, let's give that money to Manitoba! Our taxpayers don't need economic development, especially in areas of culture.

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